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Full text of "Various types of southern colleges for women."

THE VARIOUS TYPES OF SOUTHERN COLLEGES FOR WOKEN. 

By 
Elizabeth Avery Colton 




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in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



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Horth Carolina Si 

THE 

VARIOUS TYPES OF SOUTHERN 

COLLEGES FOR WOMEN 



ELIZABETH AVERY COLTON 

IM 



BULLETIN 2 OF 1916 PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOUTHERN 
ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE WOMEN 



\c 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
State Printers and Binders 



THE VARIOUS TYPES OF SOUTHERN 
COLLEGES FOR WOMEN 



Elizabeth Avery Colton, 

President of the Southern Association of College Women. 

As the term college is applied in the South to private second- 
ary schools, "special study" schools, and normal schools, as well 
as to liberal arts colleges, southern girls often mistake nominal 
colleges for real colleges. The object of this bulletin, therefore, 
is to point out the type of education provided at the various 
institutions in the South calling themselves colleges for women 
so that southern girls may be able to choose intelligently institu- 
tions at which to continue their education. Many will for 
various reasons still prefer "special study" schools, unrecognized 
denominational colleges, and normal and industrial colleges; 
but this report should enable them to know in advance the type 
of education furnished at the institution selected. 

There are in the South a hundred and twenty-four institutions 
bearing the name college for women. These institutions may be 
roughly grouped under the following heads: (1) Standard Col- 
leges; (2) Approximate Colleges; (3) JSTormal and Industrial 
Colleges; (4) Junior Colleges; (5) "Unclassifiable" Colleges, 
and (6) Nominal and Imitation Colleges. 

I shall explain in turn the general nature of the work done by 
each group as a whole; and whenever possible I shall state the 
individual characteristics of each institution in the group. 2 

I. Standard Colleges 3 — colleges of liberal arts belonging to 
the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of 
the Southern States. 

The object of a college of liberal arts is "general intellectual 



2 The data in this Bulletin is based mainly on catalogues with announcements 
for 1915-'16; in a few cases catalogues with announcements for 1916-'17 were 
secured before this went to press. 

3 For distinction between standard colleges and Methodist "Class A" colleges, see 
page 26. 



4 Bulletin of the Southern 

training and moral enlightenment." 4 These colleges, therefore, 
have as their purpose the subjecting of their students to the 
several kinds of mental discipline — "in philosophy; in some 
one of the great sciences; in some one of the great languages 
which carry the thought of the world ; in history and in politics, 
which is its framework — which will give one valid naturalization 
as a citizen of the world of thought, the world of educated men." 4 
Students who wish technical training in industrial subjects, in 
methods of teaching, or in fine arts, should choose normal schools 
or "conservatories"; but those who wish "general intellectual 
discipline narrowed to no one vocation or calling" 4 should go to 
a college of liberal arts. 

The following data in regard to the seven standard colleges 
for women in the South may help prospective college students 
in their choice of a college. * 

Agnes Scott College Decatur, Ga. 

"Presbyterian in its influence." Admitted to the Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States in 1907. Be- 
ginning with 1912 its degree represents four years of college work. 
Confers only the A.B. degree. Only college for women in Georgia 
whose graduates are eligible to membership in the Southern Associ- 
ation of College Women. (For standard college entrance require- 
ments, see page 25.) 

Endowment in 1916 $186,000 

Volumes in library (well selected) about 7,500 

Regular college students 219 

Irregular and special students 84 

Converse College Spartanburg, 8. C. 

Non-sectarian. Admitted to the Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States in 1912. Beginning with 
1914 its A.B. degree represents four years of college work. Only 
college for women in South Carolina whose graduates (beginning 
with 1912) are eligible to membership in the Southern Association 
of College Women. [The B. Mus. degree does not admit to member- 
ship in the Southern Association of College women.] (For standard 
college entrance requirements, see page 25.) 



4 Wilson, Woodrow: What Is a College For? in Rice's College and the Future, 
pages 88-106. 



Association of College Women. 5 

Endowment in 1916 $111,776.11 

(To be collected by January, 1917, $55,733.89.) 

Volumes in library (well selected) 7,000 

Regular college students 158 

Fine arts, irregular, and special students 175 

Florida State College for Women. . . .Tallahassee, Fla. 

Admitted to the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of 
the Southern States in 1915. Beginning with 1917 its degrees will 
represent four years of work above the high school. But as Florida 
State College requires no foreign language for admission to its B.S. 
courses and as graduates of its affiliated Normal School are admit- 
ted to the junior class of the B.S. course of the College, it is doubtful 
whether its B.S. degree will be recognized by the Southern Associa- 
tion of College Women in 1917.6 This institution is, however, well- 
equipped and is supported by the State on the same basis as the 
University of Florida. 

Volumes in library 8,500 

Regular college students 105 

Normal school, special, and high school students 368 

Goucher College Baltimore, Md. 

Formerly Woman's College of Baltimore. Founded by Baltimore 
Conference of the M. B. Church. Only college for women in Mary- 
land whose graduates are eligible to membership in the Southern 
Association of College Women; and only college for women in the 
South which has yet been recognized by the Association of Collegiate 
Alumnae. (For standard college entrance requirements, see page 25.) 

Endowment in 1916 $846,555 

Volumes in library 20,000 

Regular college students 475 

Unclassified students 23 

H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, New Orleans, La. 

Non-sectarian. Founded in 1886, coordinate with Tulane Univer- 
sity. Member of the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
of the Southern States since 1903. Only college for women in Louisi- 
ana whose graduates are eligible to membership in the Southern 
Association of College Women. (For standard college entrance re- 
quirements, see page 25.) 



5 For standard college entrance requirements, see page 25. 

6 For conditions on whieh colleges are recognized by the Southern Association of 
College Women, see page 27. 



6 Bulletin of the Southern 

Endowment (productive) $2,250,000 

(Non-productive, including present plant, $1,500,000.) 

Volumes in library 15,000 

(Library of Tulane and libraries in city are open to 
students.) 

Regular college students in 1915 158 

Regular art, education, and music students 129 

Special and "studio" students 126 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College Lynchburg, Va. 

Admitted to the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of 
the Southern States in 1902. Placed on the accepted list of the 
Carnegie Foundation in 1907; but in 1909 for denominational rea- 
sons withdrew. Only woman's college of the Methodist "Class- A" 
group? that has yet been recognized by any non-sectarian educational 
agency as a standard college. Randolph-Macon and Westhampton 
are the only colleges in Virginia whose graduates are eligible to 
membership in the Southern Association of College Women. (For 
standard college requirements, see page 25.) 

Endowment $382,730 

Volumes in library 15,000 

Regular college students 518 

Irregular and special students 92 

Westhampton College Richmond, Va. 

Baptist; coordinate with Richmond College, which was admitted 
to the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern 
States in 1910. Westhampton and Randolph-Macon are the only col- 
leges for women in Virginia whose graduates are eligible to member- 
ship in the Southern Association of College Women. 

Endowment in 1915, approximately $250,000 

(Its share in Richmond College endowment in 1915-'16.) 

Volumes in library used by Westhampton students 20,000 

Regular college students 114 

Special students 3 



7 For distinction between standard colleges and Methodist "Class A" Colleges, see 
page 26. 



Association of College Women. 7 

II. Approximate Colleges — colleges of liberal arts not suffi- 
ciently well organized and not sufficiently equipped in 
1915-'16 to conform to all the regulations of the Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the South- 
ern States, but offering four years of work which might 
justly entitle especially good students to graduate 
standing in first class institutions. 8 

The main distinctions between the institutions here character- 
ized as "approximate colleges" and the standard colleges of 
Group I are: (1) That these colleges maintain preparatory 
departments; (2) that they have a larger proportion of special- 
study pupils; (3) that they have poorer library and laboratory 
equipment, 9 and (4) that they do not pay as good salaries, and, 
therefore, as a rule, do not secure as many professors distin- 
guished for creative and research work. 

The entrance requirements, however, of the colleges in this 
group are as good as the entrance requirements of the colleges 
in Group I. In fact, Sweet Briar and Tennessee College do not 
allow any substitution for the second foreign language require- 
ment, and so conform more closely to the admission requirements 
of the best eastern colleges for women than any other colleges 
for women in the South. 

The data given below may be of interest to prospective 
college students who cannot afford to go to a standard northern 
or southern college, or who for denominational reasons prefer 
an approximate college. 

Baylor College Belton, Texas. 

Baptist. Graduates of 1915 are the first who presented as much 
as fourteen entrance units. Since 1911 Baylor University has given 
full credit for all work done at Baylor College; and last September 
several 1915 juniors were admitted to the senior class of the Uni- 
versity of Texas. 



s In a few cases graduates of colleges in this group have done excellent work in 
graduate schools of standard institutions ; but this does not indicate that the ap- 
proximate college concerned is equal in standing to the university accepting one or 
two of its most brilliant graduates. A bright student from a poorly equipped col- 
lege is able to do better work than a mediocre student from the best equipped col- 
lege. Compare San Antonio College, page 16. 

9 The Specialist in Higher Education in a recent report on North Carolina colleges 
states that the laboratory equipment of Meredith College and of Salem is "only ele- 
mentary" ; a similar investigation of the other colleges in this group would no doubt 
reveal a similar weakness in all. 



8 Bulletin of the Southern 

Endowment Apparently None 

Volumes in library 5,900 

Regular college students 130 

Preparatory, special, and special study pupils 360 

Hollins College Hollins, Va. 

Privately owned. Graduates of 1913 are the first who presented 
fourteen entrance units; but in two cases students who graduated 
from Hollins before 1913 and taught for several years did excellent 
graduate work at Radcliffe. (See footnote, page 7.) Hollins still 
keeps up the custom of awarding department certificates in various 
subjects. Practical work in art is counted toward a degree. 

Endowment Self-supporting 

Volumes in library "over" 6,000 

College students 106 

Preparatory, special, and irregular students 112 

Hood College Frederick, Md. 

Reformed Church. Graduates of 1911 were the first who presented 
as much as fourteen entrance units. The President of Hood reports 
that two sophomores have since 1911 received full credit at Smith. 

Endowment $43,000 

Volumes in library "about" 6,000 

Regular college students 80 

Preparatory, special, and special-study pupils 234 

Meredith College Raleigh, N. C. 

Baptist. Only college for women in North Carolina that has yet had 
graduates 1 *) who presented fourteen recorded units for entrance; and 
from statistics compiled by the Specialist in Higher Education and 
published by the North Carolina Department of Education, Meredith 
appears to be the only college for women in the State that keeps ex- 
cellent records both of entrance credits and of college work. A 1913 
graduate and a 1914 graduate did excellent work in graduate courses 
at Radcliffe in 1913-'14 and in 1914-'15, respectively. 
Endowment (productive) $121,843.18 

(Non-productive, including bequests, $58,050.00.) 
Volumes in library 5,346.00 

(State and Raney libraries are used by students.) 

Regular college students 135 

Special college students 4 

Preparatory and resident music and art students 113 

Non-resident music and art students 150 



"Graduates of 1915 were the first who presented fourteen entrance units. 



Association of College Women. 9 

Sweet Briar College Sweet Briar, Va. 

Not controlled by any denominational body. Entrance require- 
ments identical with those of best northern colleges for women (see 
page 25.) One Sweet Briar graduate has entered the Cornell Medical 
College and another is doing graduate work at Johns Hopkins; but 
of much greater significance than the admission of its graduates, in 
individual cases, to the graduate schools of universities is the formal 
agreement of Vassar to give full credit for work done at Sweet Briar 
through the freshman year. 

Endowment (productive) None 

Volumes in library (well selected) 4,500 

Regular college students 100 

Preparatory and irregular students 105 

Salem College Winston-Salem, N. G. 

Moravian. As the 1917 graduates of Salem will be the first who 
presented fourteen entrance units, alumnae of Salem have not yet 
been admitted to graduate registration at northern universities. One 
1914 graduate received at Wellesley only thirteenii hours advanced 
credit, mainly on examination; but Wellesley is much stricter about 
giving advanced credit than any university in the country. 

Endowment $204,000 

Volumes in library (usable) 8,500 

Regular college students 89 

Special college students '21 

Preparatory and "department" students 407 

Tennessee College Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Baptist. Did not grant A.B. degree till 1912, when it represented 
four years of work above fourteen entrance units. Lacks only one- 
half unit of having entrance requirements identical with those of 
best eastern colleges for women (see page 25.) One 1912 graduate was 
admitted to graduate registration at Radcliffe, where for two years 
she has made excellent records; one 1915 graduate is doing excellent 
graduate work at Vanderbilt this year. 

Endowment (productive) None 

Volumes in library 3,000 

Regular college students 63 

Special college students 5 

Preparatory, elementary, and special students 145 



u One hour of this was still provisional in July, 1915. 



10 Bulletin of the Southern 

Wesleyan College Macon, Ga. 

Methodist The 1912 graduates of Wesleyan were the first who 
presented fourteen entrance units. Rated by the Board of Education 
of the Methodist Church in the same class with its "A" colleges for 
men. (For distinction between Methodist "Class A" colleges and 
standard colleges, see page 26.) Graduate registration has been 
promised by Teachers College to alumnae of Wesleyan since 1912; 
"conditional" and provisional graduate registration has also been 
promised by the University of Chicago to graduates since 1912. 

Endowment in 1915-'16 approximately equivalent to $166,800 

Volumes in library "about" 5,500 

Regular college students 162 

Preparatory, special, and special-study pupils 304 

(Non-resident music students are included.) 

III. Normal and Industrial Colleges — institutions organ- 
ized primarily for the purpose of giving training in 
industrial subjects and in methods of teaching. 

Some normal schools are "turning aside from their definite 
and important function" — the technical training of teachers to 
carry on the work of elementary education — "in the effort to 
transform themselves/' according to Dr. Pritchett, 12 "into weak 
colleges ; but it should be borne in mind that normal and indus- 
trial colleges are not, and cannot, in the strict sense of the 
term, be colleges of liberal arts. It is therefore impossible to 
rate these institutions on the same basis as liberal arts colleges. 

Those who wish a liberal college education should go to a 
college of that type; but those who wish to major in domestic 
science, domestic art, and in manual training, and who wish 
special training in methods of teaching, will find the normal 
and industrial colleges named below better equipped for this 
type of work than colleges of liberal arts. 

College of Industrial Arts Denton, Texas. 

Mississippi Industrial Institute and College, 

Columbus, Miss. 
North Carolina Normal and Industrial College, 

Greensboro, N. C. 



^Transforming Normal Schools Into Colleges in the Seventh Annual Report of the 
Carnegie Foundation, pages 149-152. 



Association of College Women. 11 

Normal School of Florida State College, 

Tallahassee, Fla. 

State Normal School for Women Farmville, Ya. 

Winthrop Normal and Industrial College, 

Rock Hill, 8. G. 

The Virginia State Normal School for Women seems to be the 
only one of the above that has held rigidly to the distinct 
function of a normal school; this is probably largely due to the 
fact that Virginia has for many years had a standard college 
for women (even though denominational) whereas South Caro- 
lina has had a standard college for women only since 1912, 
and Mississippi and North Carolina have not yet had any 
separate college for women recognized by the Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States. 

IV. Junior Colleges — institutions offering the first two years 
of college work. 

Many of the institutions in this group are still only poor 
preparatory schools with poor music and art departments, but 
they deserve some credit for having reduced their claims from 
four years of college work to two. I have arranged them in 
groups, which, however, do not indicate the relative rank of 
these institutions; for some in the last group are far ahead of 
a number in some of the preceding groups. 

1. Junior Colleges recognized by the Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools of the Southern States. 

None. 

The Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the South- 
ern States voted in November, 1915, to admit institutions to member- 
ship as junior colleges on the following conditions: 

1. The college work must be the essential part of the curriculum 
of any institution recognized as a junior college; therefore, junior 
colleges must publish in their annual catalogues a classified list of 
all their students. 

2. If a preparatory department is maintained, its work must be 
approved by the Association. 

3. The minimum requirements for admission to the college classes 
must correspond with the present requirements of this Association. 

4. For graduation from the junior college, the student must com- 
plete satisfactorily thirty year, or sixty semester, hours of work 



12 Bulletin of the Southern 

equivalaent to that given in the freshman and sophomore years of 
colleges belonging to this association. 

5. No junior college shall confer a degree; a junior college diploma 
may be awarded. 

6. The number of teachers, their training, the amount of work 
assigned them, the number of college students, the resources and 
equipment of the junior college are vital factors in fixing the stan- 
dard of an institution and must be considered by the Executive 
Committee in recommending any institution for membership. On 
these points, therefore, the Executive Committee shall issue recom- 
mendations from time to time for the purpose of informing institu- 
tions seeking membership in the Association concerning conditions 
to be met.is 

2. Institutions formally recognized as Junior Colleges by 
standard colleges and universities. 

(a) By the University of Missouri: 

Christian College Columbia, Mo. 

Cottey College Nevada, Mo. 

Habdin College Mexico, Mo. 

Howard-Payne College Fayette, Mo. 

Lindenwood College St. Charles, Mo. 

Stephens College. Columbia, Mo. 

Synodical College Fulton, Mo. 

William Woods College Fulton, Mo. 

The University of Missouri requires all junior colleges accredited 
by it to offer two years of college work under the following condi- 
tions: (1) Students shall not be permitted to carry for credit more 
than sixteen hours of work a week; (2) classes must not be crowded 
and teachers must not have an excessive amount or variety of work; 
(3) all college teachers should have had training equivalent to four 
years of standard college work; (4) there must be a laboratory for 
physical science and one for biological science adequately equipped, 
and sufficiently large for individual work on the part of student; 
there must be adequate library equipment; (6) the instruction given 
must be satisfactory. 

Since an inspector appointed by the University reports on 
all the above points before a junior college is accredited, the 
only marked distinction between the different institutions in 

"Proceedings of the Twenty-first Annual Meeting of the Association of Colleges of 
the Southern States, page 84. 



Association of College Women. 13 

this group is in the proportion of college students to the total 
number. Several do not publish a classified list of students, 
which presumably indicates an extremely small proportion of 
regular college students; Stephens apparently leads in the 
number and proportion of students in regular college classes. 

(b) By Transylvania College and by the State University 
of Kentucky: 

Hamilton College Lexington, Ky. 

Junior college students, 42; college preparatory, 75; grammar 
school and special students, 48. Six members of its faculty hold de- 
grees from standard colleges in addition to foreign and university 
training of the teacher of French. Preparatory work of Hamilton 
is accredited by Vassar. Hamilton and Kentucky College, appar- 
ently the two best equipped and best organized institutions south of 
Missouri offering junior college courses, are especially recom- 
mended by the Southern Association of College Women because they 
clearly state in their catalogues that examinations are required for 
advanced standing in some colleges. In fact no southern institu- 
tion has been accredited as a junior college by eastern colleges for 
women. 

3. Institutions classed as Junior Colleges by the Methodist 
Board of Education. 

Blackstone College Blackstone, Va. 

Students not classified. Four members of its faculty hold degrees 
from standard colleges. Still registered as a secondary school by 
the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern 
States. Announced in 1915 its intention of becoming a junior college. 

[Howaed-Payne College. See page 12.] 

Logan College Russelville, Ky. 

Students not classified. The statement on page 21 of its 1915-'16 
catalogue to the effect that its "graduates may enter without exam- 
ination the Junior Class of standard colleges" is misleading. No 
standard college in the South reported Logan as an accredited 
junior college last October. (Compare Hamilton College above.) 
Three members of the faculty of Logan hold degrees from standard 
colleges. 



14 Bulletin of the Southern 

Mansfield College Mansfield, La. 

Students not classified. Courses of study very indefinite. Appears 
to be doing mainly preparatory and special-study work. 

Martin College Pulaski, Tenn 

The 1915 catalogue reported 16 "regular" students in courses above 
preparatory work and 23 regular students in third and fourth year 
preparatory work. Total number of students, 213. Awards a junior 
college diploma. Three members of Martin faculty hold degrees 
from standard colleges; a fourth with a degree from Emory has done 
some work at Chicago and Columbia. 

4. Institutions rated as Junior Colleges by the State Board of 
Education of Virginia. 

Marion College Marion, Ya. 

College students, 13; total number, 132. Classification of students 
indicates that it may improve. Two members of its faculty hold 
degrees from standard colleges. 

Mary Baldwin Seminary Staunton, Ya. 

Students not classified. College preparatory course tentatively 
accredited by Vassar. Eight members of its faculty hold degrees 
from standard colleges. Seems to be one of the best "finishing" 
schools in the South rather than a junior college; its training, how- 
ever, is superior to that of most of the institutions in this group. 

Southern College Petersburg, Ya. 

Students not classified. Only seven of its students in 1915 carried 
as many as four college subjects, counting domestic science and 
domestic art as college subjects. Two members of its faculty hold 
degrees from standard colleges. The President "prides himself on 
having a school of the best ante-bellum traditions." 1 * This charac- 
terizes its work better than the designation junior college. 

Stonewall Jackson Institute Abingdon, Ya. 

The announcement for 1915-'16 contained no list of students or of 
faculty. 

Sullins College Bristol, Ya. 

Suspended for second semester of 1915-'16. May rebuild later. 



'Sargents' Handbook of Private Schools (1915), page 147. 



Association of College Women. 15 

Virginia College Roanoke, Va. 

College students, 42; total, 160. Preparatory work tentatively ac- 
credited, but not yet tested, by Vassar. (See Hamilton College, page 
13.) Six members of its faculty hold degrees from standard colleges. 

Virginia Intermont College Bistol, Va. 

College students, 62; total, 173. Graduates of 1915 were admitted 
to junior class of Westhampton on probation. Three members of its 
faculty hold degree from standard colleges, and a fourth has had 
foreign training in addition to a degree from Stetson University. 

5. Institutions of varying standard calling themselves Junior 
Colleges. 

All Saints' College Vicksburg, Miss. 

Students not classified. As only one student completed the "Junior 
College Course" in 1915, it is evidently at present a preparatory 
school rather than a junior college. Two members of its faculty 
hold degrees from standard colleges. 

Andrew College Guthbert, Ga. 

Students not classified. Colleges of faculty not given. Whole cat- 
alogue rather vague. Appears to be doing preparatory and nominal 
junior college work. 

Crescent College Eureka Springs, Ark. 

Junior college students, 12; total, 86. Five members of its faculty 
hold degrees from standard colleges. One 1915 graduate is reported 
as having received sixty hours advanced credit at the University of 
Missouri. 

Hillman College .« Glinton, Miss. 

Students not classified. No members of its faculty hold degrees 
from standard colleges; and as it allows piano, voice, and expres- 
sion to be substituted for language courses in the third and fourth 
year of its secondary school course, and to be substituted for Latin 
and Mathematics in its so-called "college" courses, it is neither a 
good preparatory school nor a junior college. 

Kentucky College for Women Danville, Ky. 

Junior college students, 11; preparatory, 50; "literary," specials, 
elementary, etc., 163; faculty, six hold degrees from standard col- 
leges. Preparatory certificate admits to Mt. Holyoke, where six stu- 



10 Bulletin of the Southern 

dents have done satisfactory work. Preparatory work tentatively 
accredited, but not yet tested, by Vassar. (See Hamilton College, 
page 13.) 

Lexington College for Women Lexington, Mo. 

Students not classified. Faculty, one holds a degree from a stan- 
dard college. From its catalogue it appears to be mainly a pre- 
paratory school and nominal college. 

Lotjisburg College Louisourg, N. C. 

Students not classified. Faculty, colleges not stated. Apparently 
mainly engaged in preparatory and "special study" work. 

Margaret College Versailles, Ky. 

Students not classified. Faculty, five held degrees from standard 
colleges in 1914-'15. Good college preparatory and junior college 
courses outlined in catalogue. 

Millersbtjrg College Miller slur g, Ky. 

Students not classified. Faculty, announcement of training not 
clear; apparently no graduates of a standard college. Until 1915-'16 
was merely a preparatory school calling itself "a college." An- 
nounces in its 1915 catalogue that it is reorganizing as a junior 
college. 

Mississippi Synodical College Holly Springs, Miss. 

Students not classified. Faculty, no graduates of standard colleges. 
Too many subjects crowded into each year to do even good prepara- 
tory work. 

San Antonio Female College San Antonio, Tex. 

Students, no list. Faculty, apparently no graduates of a standard 
college. A few of its graduates, however, have been admitted to the 
junior class of the University of Texas. But bright high school 
graduates might be able to do good junior and senior elective work 
in courses not dependent on preliminary courses in the same sub- 
ject. 



North Oro/ 



r 



Association of College Women. 17 

V. Unclassifiable Colleges — institutions of varying standard 
publishing in 1915 a classified list of students and a 
faculty list with as many as three holding degrees from 
standard colleges. 15 

Some of these institutions are new; others are in a state of 
transition, or evolution; and all outline in their catalogues 
courses of study that imitate closely those of standard colleges. 
It is therefore impossible to give an accurate rating of the 
relative value of their 1916 degrees, or of the degrees that 
those entering in 1916 will receive. A student who chooses 
one of these colleges would have more difficulty in getting credit 
at the best colleges and universities than students from the 
approximate colleges of Group II. 

Anderson College Anderson, 8. C. 

Opened in 1912. 

Athens College Athens, Ala. 

For distinction between standard colleges and Methodist "Class 
A" colleges, see page 26. Its 1914 degree represented apparently less 
than two years of college work. 

Bessie Tift College Forsyth, Ga. 

Its 1914 degree represented apparently less than two years of col- 
lege work. 

Brenatj College Gainesville, Ga. 

Its 1914 degree was estimated in one of my former reports as 
being approximately equivalent to one year of college work. From 
its May, 1915, Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 4, it still seems to be more of a 
"special study" school than a college in the strict sense of the term. 
The number registered as regular college students in 1915 was 131; 
the total number, including 76 summer school students, was 450. 



15 The fact that any number of the members of the faculty of an institution hold 
degrees from standard colleges does not necessarily imply that an institution is even 
an approximate college ; but an institution that does not have at least six experi- 
enced professors in addition to several instructors with degrees from standard col- 
leges cannot hope for recognition as a standard college. 



18 Bulletin of the Southern 

Central College* Conway, Ark. 

Coker College* Hartsville, 8. C. 

Columbia College* Columbia, S. C. 

Only two unconditioned freshmen in 1915-'16 catalogue. For dis- 
tinction between standard colleges and Methodist "Class A" colleges, 
see page 26. 

Elizabeth College Salem, Ya. 

Elizabeth College, Charlotte, N. C, was combined last fall with 
Roanoke Woman's College, Salem, Va. The 1914 degree of Elizabeth 
was approximately equivalent to one year of college work; its 
standard should be improved by its uniting with Roanoke. 

Flora McDonald College* Red Springs, N. C. 

Good domestic science laboratory; poor college records. i« 

Galloway College* Searcy, Ark. 

Especially commended for its honest advertisements. The great- 
est weakness in its curriculum seems to be its failure to give a 
"college" course in English composition. 

Greensboro College Greensboro, N. C. 

Its 1914 degree possibly represented in some cases the equivalent 
of two years of college work. The Specialist in Higher Education 
reports that its college records are "fair/' but that it keeps no record 
of entrance credits, and that it allows conditions amounting to a 
year's work. Endowment, $100,000; volumes in library, 3,400; labor- 
oratory, only elementary. For distinction between Methodist "Class 
A" colleges and standard colleges, see page 26. 

Greenville Woman's College* Greenville, S. C. 

Judson College* Marion, Ala. 

Lander College* Lander, S. C. 

Martha Washington College* Abingdon, Va. 

For distinction between Methodist "Class A" colleges and standard 
colleges, see page 26. 

Maryland College Lutherville, Md. 

Its 1915 degree did not represent any college work; it still seems 
to be a finishing school with a good music course. 



*Its 1914 degree was possibly approximately equivalent to one year of college 
work. 

lfl It is probable that many other colleges in this group have poor entrance and 
college records; but the Specialist in Higher Education has examined the records 
only of Flora MacDonald, Greensboro, and Queens, in this group. 



Association of College Women. 19 

Notre Dame College* Baltimore, Md. 

Apparently belongs in this group, but publishes no list of college 
students and does not state from what colleges the members of its 
faculty hold degrees. 

Queen's College* Charlotte, N. G. 

The Specialist in Higher Education reports that its college records 
are "fair"; that its entrance credits since 1914 are recorded; that its 
laboratory is good; that the number of volumes in its library is less 
than 1,000; and that it has no endowments 

Shorter College Rome, Ga. 

Its 1914 degree represented less than two years of college work. 

Texas Woman's College Fort Worth, Tex. 

A new institution, successor of Polytechnic College. 

Woman's College of Alabama Montgomery, Ala. 

For distinction between Methodist "Class A" colleges and standard 
colleges, see page 26. 

VI. Imitation and Nominal Colleges — institutions that are 
either preparatory schools calling themselves colleges, 
or a combination of preparatory and "special study" 
schools offering imitation college courses. 

The imitation colleges in this group differ chiefly from the 
institutions in Group V in that they are either not sufficiently 
well organized to publish a classified roll of students or in not 
having even as many as three members of their respective 
faculties with degrees from standard colleges. 18 It is not 
probable that the 1916 graduates of any institution in this group 
would receive any advanced credit at such colleges as Vassar 
and Wellesley. And the institutions in this group characterized 
as "nominal colleges" are not even good preparatory schools. 

Belhaven Collegiate and Industrial Institute, 

Jackson, Miss. 
Mainly a preparatory and "finishing" school. 



"Compare footnote on page li 
18 See note, page 17. 



20 Bulletin of the Southern 

Bethel College Hopkinsville, Ey. 

Nominal College. 

Blue Mountain College Blue Mountain, Miss. 

Nominal College. 

Bufoed College NasJwille, Tenn. 

Nominal College. Repeats entrance "requirements" in Latin and 
Mathematics in its freshman and sophomore years. No member of 
its faculty holds a degree from a standard college; but in its 1915 
catalogue the "Professor of Literature, Egnlish, Ancient and Modern 
Languages" is accorded the following degree from the University of 
of Chicago: 

Miss , M.E., A.B. 

The Examiner of the University of Chicago, however, states that 
this person was merely an "unclassified" summer school and cor- 
respondence course student. The statement on page 39 of its cata- 
logue in regard to the use of the laboratories of Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity is also inaccurate. It has, however, discontinued one of the 
customs characteristic of weak private schools; it no longer pub- 
lishes "testimonials" in its catalogue. 

Carolina College Maxton, N. C. 

Nominal College. 

Centenary "College-Conservatory". . .Cleveland, Tenn. 
Preparatory, finishing school, and nominal college courses. 

Central College for Women Lexington, Mo. 

Preparatory, "special study," and imitation college courses. 

Chicora College Columbia, 8. C. 

Chicora College, Greenville, S. C, was consolidated with College 
for Women at Columbia, S, C, in the fall of 1915. The 1914 degree of 
Chicora was approximately equivalent to one year of college work. 
Offers preparatory, "special study," and imitation college courses. 
Apparently no member of its faculty holds a degree from a standard 
college. 

Chowan College^ Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Three members of its faculty hold degrees from standard colleges, 
but it does not publish a classified list of students. Preparatory, 
special study, and imitation college courses. 



19 Its 1914 degree was possibly equivalent to one year of college work. 



Association of College Women. 21 

Claeemont College Hickory, N. C. 

Poor preparatory school. 

Cox Colleges*) College Park, Ga. 

In spite of statements on pages 20, 22, and 35 of its 1915 catalogue, 
Cox is not a standard college. Two members of its "college" faculty 
hold degrees from standard colleges, and one member of its academy 
faculty has a standard degree. Its students, however, are not classi- 
fied; 124 are recorded as "literary," and 409 "conservatory." It con- 
fers four degrees. Preparatory, special study, and imitation college 
courses. 

Davenport College Lenoir, N. C. 

In exceptional cases students have received as much as twenty- 
seven hours advanced credit at Trinity and at Meredith. Prepara- 
tory and imitation college courses; but does not confer degrees. 

Franklin Female College Franklin, Ky. 

A poor preparatory school, apparently. 

Forest Park University St. Louis, Mo. 

On page 8 of its 1915 catalogue is the statement that its "require- 
ments for graduation are similar to those of Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, 
Smith, and Vassar," but Professor Elliff, high school visitor of the 
University of Missouri, in a letter dated May 27, 1916, writes as fol- 
lows: "This institution, while a university in name, is a fairly good 
high school, giving now and then a few courses of college rank. It 
is not a standard junior college in any sense. * * * In fact it is 
not on our list of accredited high schools." 

Grenada College Grenada, Miss. 

Nominal college. 

Howard College Gallatin, Tenn. 

Apparently a poor preparatory school. 

LaGrange Female College LaGrange, Ga. 

Preparatory, special study and imitation college courses. Students 
classified. 

Limestone College Gaffney, 8. C. 

Colleges from which members of faculty hold degrees, not stated; 
students classified. Preparatory, special study and imitation college 
courses. 



20 Its 1914 degree was possibly equivalent to one year of college work. 



22 Bulletin of the Southern 

Littleton College Littleton, N. G. 

Preparatory School. 

Mt. St. Agnes College Mt. Washington, Md. 

No list of students and the training of the "resident" members of 
its faculty is not stated. 

Oxford College Oxford, N. G. 

Students extremely irregular; no students apparently in its A.B. 
course. Preparatory and special study courses combined with a 
little imitation college work. 

Sacred Heart College Belmont, N. G. 

No list either of students or of faculty. Apparently engaged 
mainly in preparatory work. 

Sayre College Lexington, Ky. 

Preparatory school. 

Soule College Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Preparatory school. 

Southern Female College LaGrange, Ga. 

Preparatory and nominal college courses. 

St. Genevieve's College Asheville, N. G. 

No list either of faculty or of students; therefore presumably 
mainly engaged in preparatory work. 

St. Joseph's College Emmitsburg, Md. 

Apparently preparatory and imitation college work. 

St. Mary's College Dallas, Tex. 

Faculty apparently well-trained, but as it publishes no list of stu- 
dents it is presumably mainly engaged in preparatory and special 
study work. Some of its graduates, however, have been admitted to 
the junior class of the University of Texas. (Compare San Antonio 
College, page 16.) 

Summerland College Batesburg, 8. G. 

Preparatory and nominal college courses. 



Association of College Women. 23 

Texas Fairemont Seminary Weatherford, Tex. 

Preparatory and nominal college courses. 

Texas Presbyterian College Milford, Tex. 

Preparatory and imitation college courses. 

"Woman's College of Due West Due West, S. C. 

Preparatory and imitation college courses. 

The following institutions failed to respond to repeated re- 
quests for catalogues ; but their previous catalogues indicate that 
if they are still in existence they belong in this group : 

Alabama Brenatj College Eufaula, Ala. 

Alabama Synodical College Talladega, Ala. 

Arcadia College Arcadia, Mo. 

Beaumont College .Harrodsburg, Ky. 

Boscobel College Nashville, Tenn. 

Carr Burdette Carlton College Sherman, Tex. 

Central College Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Central Mississippi Institute French Camp, Miss. 

Chapel Hill Female College Chapel Hill, Tex. 

Linwood College Gastonia, N. C. 

Liberty College Glasgow, Ky. 

Marion Seminary Marion, Ala. 

Memphis Conference Female Institute, Jackson, Tenn. 
North Texas College (Kidd Key Conservatory), 

Sherman, Tex. 

Port Gibson Female College Port Gibson, Miss. 

Rogersville Synodical College Rogersville, Tenn. 

Statesville Female College Statesville, N. C. 

Switzer College Itasca, Tex. 

Tuscaloosa College Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Whitworth College Brookhaven, Miss. 



24 Bulletin of the Southern 

College Preparatory and "Finishing" Schools 



A certificate of graduation from any of the college prepara- 
tory schools cited below, or a diploma from any of these schools 
that offer a "General Course," is of greater value than a degree 
from any of the imitation or nominal colleges mentioned in 
Group VI. 

Asheville School for Girls Asheville, N. C. 

Ashley Hall* Charleston, S. C. 

Birmingham Seminary Birmingham, Ala. 

Chatham Episcopal Institute Chatham, Va. 

Elletts (Miss) School* Richmond, Va. 

El Paso School for Girls* El Paso, Tex. 

Fairmont School Monteagle, Tenn. 

Fassifern School* Hendersonville, N. C. 

Girls' Preparatory School* Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hutchinson's (Miss) School* Memphis, Tenn. 

Kentucky Home School* Louisville, Ky. 

Lucy Cobb Institute Athens, Qa. 

Margaret Allen School* Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Booth School* .Montgomery, Ala. 

Mulholland School* San Antonio, Tex. 

Pape School* Savannah, Oa. 

Peace Institute Raleigh, N. C. 

Randolph-Macon Institute Danville, Va. 

Science Hill School* Shelbyville, Ky. 

Silliman Collegiate Institute Clinton, ha. 

Southern Seminary* Buena Vista, Va. 

St. Anne's School Charlottesville, Va. 

St. Hilda's Hall Charlestown, W. Va. 

St. Mary's Hall San Antonio, Tex. 

St. Mary's School* Memphis, Tenn. 

St. Mary's School Raleigh, N. C. 

Stuart Hall Staunton, Va. 

Washington Seminary* Atlanta, G-a. 

Ward Belmont School* Nashville, Tenn. 

Whitis (The) School* Austin, Tex. 



*On the secondary school list of the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States or accredited in 1915-'16 by Smith, Vassar, or 
Wellesley. 



Association of College Women. 25 

Standard College Entrance Requirements 



The entrance requirements to the bachelor of arts course of 
standard colleges in the South vary slightly; but a student who 
creditably completes the following amount of secondary school 
work should be prepared for unconditioned entrance to the 
freshman class of any college or university, JSTorth or South. 

English. Four years of high school work according to the 
conditions suggested by the Committee on Uniform Entrance 
Requirements in English. 

History. A full year course in either Ancient, English, or 
American History. 

Latin. Four years (it usually takes five) of work, including, 
in addition to prose composition, four books of Gwsar; Cicero's 
four orations against Catiline, the one for the Manilian Law, 
and the one for Archias; and the first six books of Vergil's 
Mneid. 

Mathematics. Three years of work, covering algebra, through 
the progressions (two years), and plane geometry (one year), 
including original exercises. 

French. Two years of work, which should include the read- 
ing of from 400 to 600 pages of graduated texts and easy modern 
prose. 

German. Two years of work which should include the read- 
ing of from 225 to 300 texts and easy stories and plays. 

Students in high schools that have good laboratory equipment 
may substitute a year's work in each of two sciences (chemistry, 
physics, botany) for either French or German; or they may 
substitute a year's work in one science (chemistry, physics, 
botany) and an additional year's work in history for either 
French or German. Some southern standard colleges for 
women allow other substitutions, but those suggested above are 
preferred by all. 



26 Bulletin of the Southern 

Southern Standard Colleges and Methodist "Class A" 
Colleges. 

Much confusion has arisen from the classification of Metho- 
dist colleges by the Board of Education of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. They have a Class A of colleges for men, 
and a Class A of colleges for women rated on an entirely different 
basis. And the general public reading the advertisements of 
such colleges as Athens, Columbia, Greensboro, Martha Wash- 
ington, and Woman's College of Alabama, does not stop to 
consider that they are not national Class A colleges, but Metho- 
dist Class A colleges — and colleges for women at that. Since 
there is no longer a national "Division A" of colleges, the only 
way to determine whether a Methodist "Class A" college in the 
South is a standard college or not is to find out whether it 
belongs to the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
of the Southern States. 

The following is a complete list of all colleges in the South 
belonging to the Southern College Association, with the date of 
their election to membership : 

Vanderbilt University (1895) Nashville, Tenn. 

University of North Carolina (1895) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

University of the South (1895) Sewanee, Tenn. 

University of Mississippi (1895) University Miss. 

Washington and Lee University (1895) Lexington, Va. 

Trinity College (1895) Durham, N. C. 

University of Tennessee (1897) Knoxville, Tenn. 

University of Alabama (1897) University, Ala. 

West Virginia University (1900) Morgantown, W. Va. 

University of Missouri (1901) Columbia, Mo. 

University of Texas (1901) Austin, Tex. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College (1902) Lynchburg, Va. 

Tulane Universitysi (1903) New Orleans, La. 

Goucher College (1903) Baltimore, Md. 

University of Virginia (1904) Charlottesville, Va. 

Randolph-Macon College (1904) Ashland, Va. 

Central University (1905) Danville, Ky. 

Agnes Scott College (1907) Decatur, Ga. 

21 Including Sophie Newcomb College. 



' 






Association of College Women. 27 

University of Georgia (1909) Athens, Ga 

Richmond College22 1910) Richmond, Va. 

University of Chattanooga (1910) • Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Southwestern Presbyterian University (1911) Clarksville, Tenn. 

Mercer University (1912) Macon, Ga. 

Southern University (1912) Greensboro, Ala. 

Millsaps College (1912) Jackson, Miss. 

Converse College (1912) Spartanburg, S. C. 

University of Louisiana (1913) Baton Rogue, La. 

University of Florida (1913) Gainesville, Fla. 

Johns Hopkins University (1914) Baltimore, Md. 

The William M. Rice Institute (1914) Houston, Tex. 

Baylor University (1914) Waco, Tex. 

Florida State College for Women (1915) Tallahassee, Fla. 

University of Louisville (1915) Louisville, Ky. 

State University of Kentucky (1915) Lexington, Ky. 

Transylvania College (1915) Lexington, Ky. 

George Peabody College for Teachers (1915) Nashville, Tenn. 

Southern University (1915) Georgetown, Tex. 

The Eligible List 23 of the Southern Association of 
College Women. 

The eligible list of colleges of the Southern Association of 
College Women is made up (1) of colleges belonging to the 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern 
States that require a minimum of four units of foreign language 
for entrance, and a minimum of two years of foreign language 
for graduation; (2) of colleges on the accepted list of the Car- 
negie Foundation; (3) of colleges recognized by the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae; (4) and of a few approved colleges out- 
side the territory covered by the Southern College Association 
and not included in group (2) or (3). 



"Including Westhampton College. 

23 This list may be obtained from the Secretary of the Southern Association of 
College Women, Miss Mary Leal Harkness, Newcomb College, New Orleans, La. 



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